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« Creating Information Architecture at Océ in the Age of Enterprise 2.0 | Main | Simultaneous TV and Internet Use Continues to Rise »

September 30, 2009

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Ron Callari

As an intermediate answer to your question, I think "Clickable TV" is going to be the first interface for this convergence before they become totally married ---> http://www.digitalmediabuzz.com/2009/09/the-race-for-clickable-tv/

bill  Ives

Ron

Thanks. I will check this out. Bill

JT Maloney


Hi –

In a word? Ridiculous. My wide-screen Samsung HD-TV is a computer! It operates with other computers like a DRV and DVD.

Not sure what is meant by ‘win’ either. If the meaning is accessing content by the largest number of devices, neither the TV or computer will win that race. Smart phones and handheld devices will prevail there.

However, the real, dramatic change is not in the simple access hardware, but the network configuration of content.

Anyway, broadcast TV to 'dumb' clients (and some may say viewers and programming) is here to say. To paraphrase the great Mark Twain, ‘The reports of the death of TV have been greatly exaggerated.’

Note: pundits ALWAYS predict the premature death of technologies. It is their stock-in-trade.

Here are ten ‘long dead’ technologies used every single day.

1. Analog watches
2. Dot-matrix printers
3. Typewriters
4. Broadcast radio
5. Pagers
6. Reel-to-reel tape
7. Vacuum tubes
8. Fax machines
9. Mainframe computers
10. Fortran

Credit:

Technology Review: Ten Technologies That Refuse to Die
www.technologyreview.com/articles/scigliano0204.asp

-j

bill  Ives

John Thanks for your comment. I agree on several points - the mobile device will be the real winner as I have posted on before. I also use mine (iPhone) for my main music player. Also, the premature prediction of technology deaths. However, some do go such as typewriters, blacksmiths, vinyl records (except for collectors). It would be interesting to see the common qualities of those that live on and those that die. Bill

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