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« Enterprise 2.0 Conference – Boston | Main | Lessons in Web 2.0 from Green Tea Ice Cream »

June 12, 2007

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Enterprise 2.0 Success Stories on the new Sharepoint:

» SharePoint como producto para Enterprise 2.0 from Jorge Dieguez Blog
La Empresa 2.0(Enterprise 2.0), esta palabra/concepto que de pronto se ha puesto de moda,en Microsoft [Read More]

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Olivier Amprimo

Bonjour,

The cases you mention to illustrate your post relate to what MOSS has to offer: document life cycle management. That's not a surprise as it has been developed by people dealing with knowledge management with a librarian background (for instance the great Mary-Lee Kennedy, in Boston now).

Now when it comes to the 2.0 features, I think a lot of people make a mistake considering MOSS is 2.0 in its latest version. It's pretty much 2.0 compliant but to a certain extend. Okay, there are wiki and blog and social-bookmark feature in MOSS 2007 but is it sufficient? Is 2.0 all about tools? I don't think so personally but if so, is MOSS the best tool? When one benchmark the functionalities of the wiki and blog contained within MOSS with existing solutions live for months, the comparison is not in favour of Microsoft. Their functionalities are so poor that one can legitimately wonder why they are here.

Is it because the market is 2.0 that they incrusted 2.0 features? That probably is the best answer. Microsoft wrapped their document management app up to keep selling a cash cow product. Cool for them, but what about users, organisations and employees?
Users will have to use poor tools and not be in a position to complain of the functionalities' dryness. Organisations will miss the opportunity to enlarge their providers, ending being locked in a 100% MS world, missing the innovation and financial benefits of a sound competition. That's not really 2.0 in essence, pretty much 1.0: "use it and shut up".

Anticipated consequence is that companies will invest loads in a solution that shall most probably make their employees unhappy on the long term. Microsoft kills two birds with one stone:
1 - Legitimately expected productivity from social tools will not be here and consequently there is a risk that the 2.0 market collapse the same way as the KM one did.
2 - In a knowledge economy, an unhappy employee is a non productive employee.

Instead of pursuing this quest of the off-the-shelf all in one IT solution, people would probably have more benefits in picking the best dedicated solutions available, smartly combine their functionalities and work on a nice integrative interface. For instance, Sharepoint (for structured document management only), Movable Type (for conversations only), Confluence (for co-writing only) along with Cogenz (for shared bookmarks only) can easily integrate and provide superior productivity outcomes.

Of course blogs, wikis, social-bookmarks are 2.0 but mashup too. If organisations want to go down all the 2.0 way, they should also consider social tools mashup, just like internauts do/did in the wild wild web ... and for the very same reason: efficiency.

jheuristic

Hi --

Not sure about all the '2.0' hubris, but can say I have been a heavy user of SharePoint for years and could not imagine how to work without it. SP 3.0 will knock-your-socks-off. For a free trial use Apptix.

http://www.sharepointsite.com/

To sign-up call:

Michael Jakubik
Sales Executive
Apptix Incorporated
(201) 809-1714 (Direct)
(703) 890-2801 (Fax)
michael.jakubik@apptix.com


-j

Didier Masse

Dear Bill,

I would say that I am using MOSS and I can tell you that I am totally satisfied of that product. It's pretty much 2.0 compliant, and it works very well when all your network is based on a 100% Ms Solution.

Bill Ives

Didier, John , and Olivier - Thanks for your input. It is a topic which evokes strong opinions in both directions.

Gemini

In my opinion, MOSS is THE most powerful KM system till date. I have worked on various applications including MOSS, Lotus Notes, and those based on Open Source. I have found that MOSS is the best when it comes to power and ease of use. Indeed a true KM system.

SharePointFrank

Just to add some brand-new screens of SharePoint Collaborative Knowledge Management to the entry above:

http://www.layer2.de/en/products/Pages/SharePoint-2010-Taxonomy-Metadata.aspx

records management

SharePoint helps us in the most basic way possible- it's just keeps all of our work organized, eases the process of sharing files with colleague and writing presentations etc.
I don't see a reason way not to use it.

comment system

Sharepoint is a web based collection of sites. It is very hard to define exactly what Sharepoint is for one simple reason.. it is so many things!

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